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Exploring the Conflicting Gender Roles in Marketing Professional Female Athletes
Jami Lobpries, Ph.D
"Two months removed from the 2012 Olympic Games, the majority of the fame, spotlight, and national attention for the female Olympic athletes subsided. In fact, the majority of these women often do not have viable professional leagues to return to post-Olympics. Gender disparities continue to exist in the sports world, particularly in..."

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The Chicken or The Egg?
Chang Woock Lee, B.A.
"The chicken or the egg? No, this is not about the famous causality dilemma of “which came first?” but rather about excellent sources of dietary protein."

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Is That Favorite Pair Of Jeans Worth It?
Corinne Metzger, M.S.
"Maybe you have cut back on calories to fit into your favorite pair of jeans. On the other side of the spectrum, doctors encourage people to lose weight to lower the risk of chronic diseases. And beyond that, athletes watch their calories in the hopes of being leaner, lighter, or faster for their sport. All these are good, right?"

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Coffee: Teacher, Mother, Secret Lover?
Steve Bui, M.S.
"Chances are as you are reading this article you have already gulped down at least one cup of coffee for the day. This age old drink has been the secret weapon for many who need to wake up early, need to increase productivity throughout the day, or just simply need to supplement any meal with a hot beverage. What makes coffee so great and why does it keep you energized?"

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Just Follow the Yellow Brick Road: A Guide to Performing Complex Bimanual Coordination Patterns
Deanna Kennedy, M.S.
"Coordinating movements between the limbs is important for many activities of daily living and sport specific skills. Buttoning your shirt, opening a bottle, driving your car, and serving a tennis ball are tasks that involve some type of coordination between the limbs."

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Your Blood Vessels: Essential to Healthy Aging
Meredith Luttrell, Ph.D
"We seldom think about physical effects of aging until that first wrinkle appears. While it’s easy to associate aging with changes in appearance, changes that occur within the body, such as impaired blood vessel function, are more likely to affect the quality of life even more."

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Aquatic Treadmill and Standard Land Treadmill Running Yield Different Effects When Added to a Standardized Resistance Training Program
Brad Lambert, Ph.D, CSCCA-SCCC
"For optimal health and fitness, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends both resistance and endurance exercise regularly. Both forms of exercise provide specific benefits for one’s health."

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Exercise-Induced Hyponatremia: Risk for Marathon Runners
Kaleigh Camp, M.S.
"Standing at the starting line of the 2011 San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll half marathon with over 30,000 other runners, it was clear how popular these races have become for athletes as well as non-athletes."

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Exercise: what’s really happening
Josh Avila, M.S.
"When sitting on a couch late at night watching infomercials featuring super fit, muscular people, you might wish you could look like them because you’d be really popular and happy and look great in a swimsuit. Rarely do people think “Man, I wish I had as many capillaries to my muscle fibers as those guys do!” But those inward adaptations are critically important, too."

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Resistance Exercise: a less painful start for losing weight and fighting obesity for those with low aerobic capacity
Vincent C.W. Chen, B.S.
"Have you been unable to meet an exercise goal but couldn’t last even a short time? Is there another way to start a fat-burning exercise program without painful, frustrating feelings?"

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Rubbing The Knee
Greeshma Prabhu, BPT, M.S.

"The knee is the most important joint of the leg, providing stability and locomotion. This joint is formed by the articulation of the long bones of the leg called the femur (above the knee) and the tibia (below), along with a triangular bone, the patella (or kneecap), in between. Ligaments serving the knee joint are the anterior and posterior cruciate and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments."

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Nutrition for Crossfit Athletes during Crossfit Regionals
Michael LaMantia, M.S., CSCS

"The Crossfit Regionals event consists of seven workouts through three consecutive days. The workouts include Olympic weightlifting, gymnastic movements, powerlifting movements, and overall athletic movements found in any athlete’s training regimen."

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Iron Helps Us Play
Steve Bui, M.S. 

"Iron is one of the most essential minerals to health; unfortunately, sometimes we neglect its importance. What makes iron so important?"

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Can We Prevent Decreased Mobility With Age?
Evelyn Yuen, M.S. 
"In the condition known as osteoporosis, bones become weak and susceptible to fractures. This vulnerability results from low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue."

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Shred Body Fat in just 61 Days
William Kobbe, CPT, US Army Ranger

"A title like the one above usually produces immediate interest and often some skepticism, especially in the society of quick fixes but, at least in this case, isn’t misleading. A course pioneered in the 1950’s in support of leadership development does just that -- shreds body fat."

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Motor Output Variability in Older Adults
Deanna Kennedy, M.S. 
"Often athletic performance seeks to improve accuracy and consistency. For example, while playing golf, we want to consistently hit the ball into the hole. However, many factors affect our ability to produce smooth and accurate movements. "

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Age is Just a Number: Exercise is Key for Successful Aging
Meredith Luttrell, Ph.D 

"As we get older, a vibrant quality of life enables us to keep doing the things we enjoy and that bring meaning to our lives. Exercise is important for health, but it is also one of the best ways to stay energetic and independent with age."

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Popeye's Secret is About to be Revealed
Chang Woock Lee, B.A. 
"Do you remember Popeye the Sailor, the cartoon and animation character with massive forearms and a smoking pipe in his mouth? He usually shows a calm and gentle demeanor, but when necessary, especially to protect Olive Oyl, the love of his life, from his archrival Bluto, he suddenly turns into a hyperactive action hero with superhuman strength by eating his magic food, a can of spinach."

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Can HMB Build Elite Athletes?
David Castille, M.S., CSCS 

"When it comes to competitive athletics, or just reaching goals in the gym, people are always looking for some form of aid or advantage. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (the only form of HMB), or HMB, may prove to be a potent ergogenic aid for many different kinds of athletes."

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Can School Nurses be Opinion Leaders for the HPV Vaccine?
Brittany Rosen, Ph.D, CHES 

"With the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine receiving much media attention in past years, there is talk about who should get the vaccine and what it prevents."

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Chia Seeds: “More than an answer to ceramic statue baldness”
Samantha Springer, M.S., CSCS

"The title’s quote was published by the Global Healing Center as a clever introduction to the health benefits of the infamous chia seeds. Chia pets have been a popular novelty since the 1980s, but as science advances, health discoveries are gradually shifting the purpose of this herb away from garnishing a ceramic display. It is now being classified as a superfood that should be utilized by everyone; however, endurance athletes ought to especially consider what it has to offer. "

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Bone Loss on Steroids – It Must Be Stopped!
Ramon Boudreaux, M.S. 
"A common misconception is that the skeleton is a relatively fixed structure that undergoes few changes during adulthood."

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Magnesium & Exercise-- Much Ado or Much Needed?
Sarah Renaghan, M.S.

"Magnesium – what does it do for – or to – us? As an essential trace element, it is vital to the human body. Magnesium facilitates over 300 enzymatic reactions in the human body in the areas of..."

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Quidditch: Simultaneously Pursuing Snitches and Gender Equality in Sport
Adam Cohen, Ph.D

"J.K. Rowling has accomplished more than conquering the literary world (over 400 million books in the Harry Potter series have been sold) and the movie industry (over seven billion dollars grossed worldwide). According to the 2008 Kids & Family Reading Report, she can also be given accolades for increasing children’s desire to read: "three in four kids say reading Harry Potter or having someone read Harry Potter aloud has made them-interested in reading other books." But beyond all of those successes from the franchise, there could be yet another benefit rising in schools across the country."

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I <3 Your Sugar Sweet Game! -- Exercise and Diabetes
John Seawright, B.S. 
"The national anthem has been sung, home plate has been cleaned, and the starting lineup announced. The athletes go through the final mental checklist before taking the field. Hat? Check. Glove? Check. Cup? Check. Insulin?"

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Should Selenium Be Sold?

Sheril Marek, M.S. 

"Selenium is a trace element that is nutritionally essential for humans. Essential nutrients are required for normal body functioning that cannot be synthesized by the body. This shows the importance of consuming adequate selenium in one’s diet and supplements for enhanced exercise performance and decreased health risks."

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Improving Goal-Directed Limb Movement: Don't Overthink This!
Jason Boyle, Ph.D

Our nervous system is highly adaptable in perceiving, analyzing and executing movements in relation to an ever-changing perceptual environment. We use vision, knowledge of limb location, and anticipation of force production while simultaneously recognizing variability in our judgment to execute movements through the world around us.

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Chocolate's Not So Dark Secret

Benjamin A. Tipton, M.S., SCCC

"Cocoa and its derivative chocolate have been used for thousands of years by the cultures of Central America."

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Should Women Do Resistance Exercise?
Vincent Chen, B.S 
When talking about resistance exercise, some people believe that women respond less than men in terms of muscle mass and strength gain, while others think that it may make women look bulky.

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Pay Attention to Those Little Aches and Pains: Muscles, Bones, Physical Activity, and "Itis"
Nina Laidlaw Rumler, B.A. 
This is Amuhrica, right? We power-through, man-up, and tough it out. Well, that’s not always a good strategy. We hear constantly about the benefits of physical activity but often overlook the drawbacks.

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Effects of a Combination Treatment of Fish Oil and Curcumin

Rachel Botchlett, M.S. 
Skeletal muscle is a highly specialized tissue that is responsible for voluntary motion and plays a significant role in glucose metabolism and maintaining postural support. The loss of skeletal muscle, defined as atrophy, is characterized by a marked reduction in muscle protein synthesis coupled with an increase in protein degradation and can lead to a loss of contractile force.

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Iron Bars and You
Nina Laidlaw Rumler, B.A. 
Do you know what sport uses weights and is governed by rules published in 17 different languages with participants in 100 different countries, competes males and females of all ages and sizes against others in their divisions – and is not in the Olympics?

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D is for Deficiency- An Overview of Vitamin D Deficiency and Athletes
Caitlin Hendler, M.S. 

"Most commonly known as the “Sunshine Vitamin,” the main source of this fat-soluble vitamin is exposure to sunlight because of few food sources. The benefits of vitamin D go much further than merely a bronze tan ..."

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The Invisible Death Ray – Athletes Under the Gun
John Seawright, B.S.
We’ve all seen it; the vicious collision that leaves a football wide receiver writhing in apparent pain; his strenuous, assisted walk to the locker room; and his eventual return to rejoin his team on the sideline with the accompanying statement from the sideline reporter, “The x-rays are negative.”

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What if I Want My Inflammation? -- The Effects of NSAIDs on Training Adaptations
Andrew Jagim, Ph.D, CSCS

"It makes sense right? It’s the day after a tough workout, you’re sore, it hurts to move but you have to move because you have another session with your trainer in two hours. So, what do you do? You pop some non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) to take the edge off and get back out there for round 2! The question is: Is this doing more damage than good?"

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The $2 Performance-Enhancing Supplement
Steve Bui, M.S.
"If you look at any advertising in the media, you will notice constant bombardment by ads for performance enhancing supplements. The supplement industry is one of the most lucrative marketing fields. The promise of being able to perform bigger, faster, and stronger by drinking some special water, swallowing a small pill, or anything in between just sounds so appealing. Unfortunately, unbeknownst to the majority of consumers, most supplements do not work at all."

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Beyond Choice: The Tale of an Obese Girl
Ann Amuta, MPH, CPH
"I always teased my obese friend, Molly, who grew up in the ‘hoods’ of Houston until she told me about her life’s journey to obesity and all the health complications that have ensued."

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Resistance Exercise: Turning the Bad into Good
Vincent C.W. Chen, B.S.
"High fat and high cholesterol foods are delicious, but generally, they are not healthy. When we enjoy delicious meals that are high in fat and cholesterol, we are increasing the risks of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. However, does it really mean that we should not eat this kind of food at all?"

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How Was That Tofurkey This Past Thanksgiving
Steve Bui, M.S.
"A much more popular part of the diet in East Asian countries, soy has been slowly increasing in popularity in the western diet as well."

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Impact of Exercise Training on Cardiovascular Risk and Anti-Risk Factors in Adolescents
Majid Koozehchian, M.S.
"Childhood and adolescence are critical periods in the formation of cardiovascular risk factors. Many cardiovascular diseases are related to such risk factors as high levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG), as well as low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The causes of cardiovascular risk factors are manifold, involving environment, lifestyle, and genetics."

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Talk To The Hand
Deanna Kennedy, M.S.
The ability to coordinate movements between the limbs is important for many activities of daily living and sport specific skills. For example, tying your shoes, slicing bread, driving your car, and serving a tennis ball are tasks that involve some type of coordination between the limbs. However, the role of each limb may vary with different task requirements.

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Omega-3: The Necessary Fat
Wendy Gapinski, M.S.
"You may have heard a lot about omega-3 in the news recently. But, what really is omega-3?"

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Feeling Sick? Take Some Vitamin C… Wait What?
Steve Bui, M.S.
I think it is safe to say we have all heard it at some point in our lives. I remember as a child, my mother telling me on several occasions. In fact, whenever I had the slightest cough, she would squeeze lime juice into everything I ate. Whether it is your loving family, friend, television advertisement, or newspaper, the general consensus has always been that if you are feeling sick, or have flu-like symptoms, increasing your vitamin C intake will help you recover faster and prevent future cases… Is that so?

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Big Bad Hearts…Do Football Players Have Unfavorable Cardiac Structure?
Dustin Joubert, M.A. 
"Changes in the normal structure and size of the heart and its various chambers can indicate exercise training adaptations or disease."

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Destined for Heart Disease?-NO Way!
John Seawright, B.S. 
Heart disease is a cruel ailment that befalls many Americans. It is a life threatening disease that does not strike only a single individual; the suffering proliferates through the patient’s entire family.

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N-Acetylcysteine, the Obscure Antioxidant

Majid Koozehchian, M.S.
The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a modified form of essential amino acid cysteine, which is both consumed in high-protein food and synthesized in the body, does not receive much attention but has important, positive impacts in the body (1).

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Where “Wnt” The Bone!  Resistance Exercise Prevents Bone Loss
Brandon Macias, Ph.D
"The estimated lifetime risks of an osteoporotic fracture are about 50% in women and 22% in men. Fractures in the elderly lead to large, often irreversible loss of quality of life and are associated with an increased risk of death. Furthermore, annual direct-care costs attributable to osteoporotic fractures are estimated to cost up to $18 billion in the United States. Most research to date has shown that regular weight bearing exercise helps preserve bone mineral density in postmenopausal women and older men."

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It's not just about playing the game...

Kwame J.A. Agyemang, Ph.D

For those in the workforce, you may remember completing some type of training or orientation before you actually started your duties. Thinking back, how would you rate the usefulness of that training?

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NATURE’S GATORADE: Effectiveness of Coconut Water on Electrolyte and Carbohydrate Replacement
Kyle Levers, M.S. CSCS
"The popularity of coconut water has increased significantly over the past decade due to its nutritional composition and rehydration capability. Natural coconut water is the clear liquid found inside of a young, green coconut, not to be confused with the white liquid typically squeezed from the coconut’s outer layer, known as coconut milk. A growing number of nutritional advertisements promote the use of coconut water over other well-established sports drinks, such as Gatorade or PowerAde for enhanced rehydration and electrolyte replacement."

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Alpha Lipoic Acid, the Universal Antioxidant

Majid Koozehchian, M.S.

Alpha lipoic acid (ALA), also called thioctic acid, is an antioxidant that is commonly used as a dietary supplement, particularly in the Unites States.

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Six “Sexy” Lesson Plan Examined with the HECAT Guidelines
Brittany Rosen, Ph.D, CHES

What guidelines help create an effective health education lesson plan impacting students’ behaviors? My study examined the content of six sexual health lesson plans, found online at the Advocates for Youth website.

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Mighty Mouse: Understanding Myostatin
Kevin Shimkus, B.S.
As is well known, physical gains become slower and more difficult to achieve as athletes reach a more elite status. For those involved in strength- and power-based sports, improvements in strength and mass eventually plateau, and even rigorous workout and nutritional prescriptions may yield only minimal increases. So it is little surprise that many in the athletic world are starting to pay more attention to some very special mice.

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Beeting the Competition with Nitrates
Julian Ong, MND, APD
The latest trend to hit the sports supplement industry stems from none other than the humble beetroot.

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Exercise - Take Once Daily for Better Bone Health
Ramon Boudreaux, M.S.
It is often joked that if exercise could be given as a pill it would be the most prescribed drug in the world. While some benefits of exercise are well known (e.g., the prevention of heart disease, high blood pressure, and obesity), some remain esoteric.

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ROLLING TOWARD RECOVERY: Theory of Self-Myofascial Release and Foam Rolling
Kyle Levers, M.S., CSCS
The repetitive and high performance demands surrounding athletes of all levels forces many to find the most effective, yet practical recovery methods. Various types of massage therapies have been investigated and employed by many athletes due to the historical background in rehabilitation and relaxation.

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Is The Juice Worth The Squeeze?
Andrew Jagim, Ph.D, CSCS

"Juice, roids, gym candy, pumpers and stackers are all common nicknames for substances more technically referred to as anabolic-androgenic steroids. Anabolic steroids are defined as any type of exogenous drug that mimics the effects of testosterone in the body. Most people take them with the goal of increasing muscle mass, improving performance or enhancing physical appearance."

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Compartment Syndrome: The Last True Orthopaedic Surgery Emergency?
Brandon Macias, Ph.D
Compartment syndrome is a serious condition that involves increased pressure in a muscle compartment. It can lead to muscle and nerve damage and problems with blood flow, according to the National Institutes of Health’s Medline.

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Cytoskeleton Protection by Exercise Training in the Aging Heart
Yang Lee, M.S.
Heart cells (myocytes) have distinctive shapes, structural integrity, and functions that are maintained by proteins that are part of the “cytoskeleton”.

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Using Soccer to Overcome Obstacles. A Sport-for-Homeless Success Story
Adam Cohen, Ph.D
In sports, we often hear stories about the rise and fall of athletes. One minute they are on top of the world leading every highlight show, the next minute the game has passed them by and a new superstar has stolen their thunder.

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The Power of Water—Recovery of the Modern Athlete
Kyle Levers, M.S., CSCS
"While sports performance and training have become increasingly competitive and demanding, recovery techniques continues to rely on existing therapies. Many athletes find water therapies helpful to hasten the recovery process in order to return to bouts of exercise sooner, while minimizing fatigue and injury."

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Fuel For The Race
Andrew Jagim, Ph.D, CSCS
"Runners, cyclists, and other endurance athletes are constantly looking for ways to improve their performance. A commonly used strategy is the use of nutritional supplements to “boost” energy and enable them to perform longer and or harder before fatigue sets in."

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Vitamin C Supplement: To Take Or Not To Take?
Majid Koozehchian, M.S
"Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin, and thus our body does not retain it in large amounts. It is a strong antioxidant that has a key role in..."

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Call Me Radical: Going Anti-Antioxidant?
Kevin Shimkus, B.S.
As important as regular physical exercise is for general health and well-being, a chronic lack of activity contributes to increased chances of adverse health risks and a decreased quality of life.

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Water Is Key!
Andrew Jagim, Ph.D, CSCS

"To unlock better performance, consider the humble beverage water. It is often one of the most overlooked and underappreciated ergogenic aids in today’s world of sports. The body is made up of ~70% water, which makes hydration a vital component for success-- not only during but..."

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SEXercise!

Brittany Rosen Ph.D, CHES

Andrea L. DeMaria, Ph.D

Articles encompassing sex and exercise are trending in popular magazines, with pieces such as Have an Orgasmic Workout published by Women’s Health, and Orgasm at the Gym? It’s the Female Coregasm!published by Men’s Health. Due to hyperbole surrounding the topic, and our background in sexual health, we felt it was both necessary, and interesting, to explore the topic further.

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Sclerostin: Bad to the Bone?

Brandon Macias, Ph.D

Most folks, especially those who do not suffer from bone debilitating diseases, might forget that their skeletons are “alive.”  Yes, the bone that protects your vital organs and works with your muscles to get you out of bed in the morning is constantly remodeling.

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What to do with a football lineman, when he stops being a football lineman?

Johnathan Oliver, Ph.D

Due to their intense training and physical abilities, athletes are assumed by many people to be healthy individuals. However, this may not always be the case. Studies have recently shown that football athletes, particularly linemen, are...

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 How does ‘chunking’ help expand your memory? Verifying that consolidation resulting in offline learning influences motor chunks.

Sanjeev R. Bhatia, B.P.T.

Human memory and the ability to recall vast amounts of trivia and unrelated information have intrigued scientists and researchers for quite some time. However, sometimes memory is inconsistent in its retrievability. 

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"My Racket Can't Find the Ball!"

Priscila Caçola, Ph.D

Have you ever wondered why a child learning to strike with a tennis racquet has trouble “finding” the ball? For adults, research shows that holding a racket or any tool that increases the ability of the body to reach further makes the....

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Control of wrist and arm movements of varying difficulties

Jason Boyle, Ph.D

Our muscles are controlled by “motor units”, which each consist of a neuron, and the muscle fiber(s) it activates or “innervates”. The muscle that responds is termed an “effector”. Brain mapping studies have shown that a disproportionate area of the motor cortex governs certain effectors of the body. 

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Aquatic Treadmill Running
Brad S. Lambert, Ph.D, CSCCA-SCCC
Has there ever been a time when you decided to begin an exercise program or turn your current exercise program up a notch with an increase in workout time or intensity? Also, have you ever experienced prolonged muscle soreness days after doing so?

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Homocysteine, a Quiet Killer!

Majid Koozehchian, M.S.

Homocysteine (Hcy) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid (i.e., an amino acid not used in proteins) normally present in the blood. Hcy is a by-product of normal diet but high levels in the blood can endanger cardiovascular health.

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 It’s OK to Eat Cholesterol. It May Even Be Good For You

Chang Woock Lee, B.A.

Cholesterol is perhaps the most notorious biological molecule of all. To many people, cholesterol is simply a synonym for heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular disease because...

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“I WANT TO PUMP YOU UP” but I will need a major credit card and you will need to take 167 supplements a day.

David Ferguson, Ph.D, RCEP

I am always amazed at the flavor of the moment products in health and fitness. I am sure we are all familiar with the shake weight, six minute abs, and Tae Bo. Truth is some of these infomercial products do offer a health benefit while others do little for you...

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Cholesterol Can Be Good.  Really.

Teak V. Lee, B.S.

"What’s the first thought that comes to mind when the word “cholesterol” is mentioned?  More often than not, it’s probably going to be negative.  This is probably due to the bad reputation that cholesterol has gained because of its involvement in conditions such as cardiovascular disease.  However..."

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How long can you go? Training the endurance athlete

David Ferguson, Ph.D, RCEP

Have you ever watched a marathon and wondered how individuals can run for over 26 miles? Have you ever wanted to be the one who runs for 26 miles? Do you find yourself saying that you can’t run for 26 miles because you don’t know how?

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Vitamin D and Exercise

Nina Laidlaw Rumler, B.A.

Headlines about vitamin D abound. Is it as good as they say? How does it impact exercise and athletes?

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I’m an athlete! I do not have heart problems!

David Ferguson, Ph.D, RCEP

"In today’s sporting environment, great importance is placed on the health education of the athlete. This includes proper nutrition instruction, health assessment, and the application of proper treatments and rehabilitation modalities to injured athletes. However..."

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Athletes Need Not Let Age Dog Them

Travis Irby, M.A., M.Ed

The concept of dog years lets us quantify how man’s best friend ages. The popular myth is that a dog ages every seven years for one human year. While that is not necessarily the most scientific explanation for the canine aging process, the idea of aging many years in one is something that many people can relate to. 

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PPAR-delta, the New Potential Treatment for Metabolic Syndrome, May Be Produced by Your Own Body

Vincent C.W. Chen, B.S.

Metabolic syndrome, a condition including insulin resistance (causing diabetes), obesity, hyperlipidemia (high blood lipids), hypertension, and heart disease, is mainly due to high fat diets and lack of physical activity. It has become a major health concern in modern society...

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Bittersweet Sarcopenia

Nina Laidlaw Rumler, B.A.

You might not have heard of sarcopenia, but it touches everyone – everyone who lives long enough to undergo this normal physiological process. A lessening of muscle mass and function, its cumulative effect is becoming a significant public health concern.

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I can’t breathe and you want me to run?!?!?! Understanding Exercise-Induced Asthma

David Ferguson, Ph.D, RCEP

One of the best parts of my job is that every day is different. I recall one day in particular when I received a phone call from a woman interested in coming into the lab to have a fitness assessment done.   The interesting part was that she said she did not want to do a VOmax test...

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Feel the Burn, Not the Burnout, Year Round

Travis Irby, M.A., M.Ed.

Many athletes compete in sports year round. Sometimes the athlete is involved in one sport with one long season spent with various school and club teams throughout the year. Other times, an athlete is involved in several different sports over a year. Whatever the case, it is important that the year-round athlete prevent the mental and physical burnout that can come with the rigors of never-ending competition.  

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Down-side of being a female athlete

Greeshma Prabhu, B.P.T., M.S.

Several decades ago, the US Government passed the Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which eliminated sex discrimination in any education program or activity receiving Federal aid. This law led to a rise in the female participation in sports over time, up to more than 150,000 women playing sports today...

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Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

Steve Bui, M.S.

Oh, glorious caffeine, one of man’s best friends! For typical college students and other active individuals, it is a commonly required form of nourishment for any function before 10:00 AM. While we all know the basic immediate effects of caffeine (decreased fatigue, increased energy, and decreased appetite), it might be interesting to look at how that cup of coffee might affect other parts of your day.

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A Little Fish Oil Could Go a Long Way

Justin Dobson, Ph.D(c), CSCS, SCCC 

Inflammation is a natural response to stress put on the body. It is the first step in the body’s healing process, in which repair cells are directed from the blood into the injured tissue. Acute (short-lived) inflammation is necessary, but problems arise when inflammation persists (chronic inflammation)...

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Special Issues of Social Responsibility

Kwame J.A. Agyemang, Ph.D

For quite some time, businesses and large corporations have used corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a management strategy for day-to-day operations. In summary, CSR offers a template for the way corporations should conduct business (e.g., their economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary responsibilities to society).

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To drink (your energy), or not to drink. . . that is the question.

Faith A. Lightfoot, BSE

"With the introduction of Redbull to the United States in 1997, many athletes started consuming these drinks for additional energy and a reduction of fatigue. However,..."

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The Power of Antioxidant Supplementation: Hype or Helpful?

Majid Koozehchian, M.S.

"In our bodies, oxygen constantly produces toxic substances called reactive oxygen species (ROS), also known as oxidants. Antioxidants, biomolecules that combat oxidant damage, are produced by the body and can also be taken in supplement form."

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Like a Fine Wine: Do athletes get better with age?

David Ferguson, Ph.D, RCEP 

"We have all heard the late night talk show hosts joke about an athlete’s inability to retire. In fact, there seems to be a consensus that once an athlete reaches a certain age, he should retire from the sport..."

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Eating Disorders in Athletes

Faith A. Lightfoot, BSE 

What do gymnasts Kathy Johnson, Nadia Comaneci and Cathy Rigby have in common? Over the past years they have all come forward and admitted to fighting an eating disorder. Cathy Rigby, a 1972 Olympian, battled anorexia and bulimia for 12 years. She went into cardiac arrest on two occasions as a result of it.

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The Female Athlete Triad: The Importance of Energy

Kaleigh Camp, M.S.

The American College of Sports Medicine refers to the female athlete triad as the interrelationships among energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral density. The new Triad model has each component of the female athlete triad on a continuous spectrum...

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Is GU© for You?

Emily Schmitt, M.S.

Researchers have studied diet manipulation for years in relation to delaying the onset of fatigue, and these studies have resulted in mixed conclusions. Scientific publications conclude that...

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Make Time for Nutrients

Andrew Jagim, Ph.D, CSCS

It has long been accepted that exercise, specifically resistance training, is the primary way to increase muscle mass. However, an often-overlooked component of this process is the importance of nutrition and even more importantly, the timing of nutrients. Without the proper combination of nutrients, timing and exercise, one may not reach full potential.

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Please Spit in this Tube and I Will Tell you How Stressed Out You Are.

David Ferguson, Ph.D, RCEP

"In the competitive sport world, athletes are required to train year-round in order to maintain a state of physical conditioning that will optimize performance during game day. With certain sports having longer seasons than others, this idea of year-round training can lead to the athlete becoming “overtrained”. Overtraining is described as a decrease in lean muscle mass..."

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