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Developmental Coordination Disorder

Developmental Coordination Disorder

  • 10/21/2016 2:06:00 AM
  • View Count 829
Priya Patel, M.S.Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a delay in the development of motor skills, or difficulty in coordinating movements, which results in problems performing in sports and everyday tasks (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Around 4- to 10% of school aged children in United States are affected by DCD (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). DCD prevalence rates range from about 2% in the United Kingdom to 19% in Greece, with a worldwide average of 6%. Owing t...
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The Secret Power in Eggs– Its Fat!

  • 10/14/2016 1:57:00 AM
  • View Count 2360
Vincent Chen, B.S.Fat in eggs used to be considered bad to our body. However, scientific evidences have shown that it might actually be good for your health. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), a large chicken egg contains 5 grams of fat, which counts up to 10% of total weight in an egg. It may look high, but it is actually low when comparing to other food sources. For example, half of a chicken breast, which is considered healthy meat, contains 20% daily value (DV) of fat, w...
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Shaking Up the Protein Paradigm

Shaking Up the Protein Paradigm

  • 10/7/2016 3:41:00 AM
  • View Count 688
Erin SimmonsProtein is often thought to be a workout necessity, the essential complement to every gym bag. Missing protein during the post-workout anabolic window is viewed as unfortunate, if not detrimental to one’s training goals. However, the scientific literature on this subject isn’t quite so black and white. Reviews of protein requirements have touted 1.8 g-1kg-1day-1 as the optimal protein intake for individuals undergoing training, when in fact the literature has propose...
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Extinguishing The Flame Of Inflammation

Extinguishing The Flame Of Inflammation

  • 9/30/2016 2:03:00 AM
  • View Count 652
Corrine Metzger, M.S.An uncontained fire can quickly spread and wreak havoc on areas both near and far to the instigating source. Under the right conditions, one flame can set a whole forest on fire and soon spread beyond its confines. In a similar way, inflammation can start at a local region in the body, but the damaging effects can spread to distant sites. One example of far spread damage of inflammation is the bone loss concurrent with inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (...
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Could Watermelon Extract Provide that Extra “Juice” for the End of the Race?

Could Watermelon Extract Provide that Extra “Juice” for the End of the Race?

  • 9/19/2016 1:55:00 AM
  • View Count 2095
Kelsey McLaughlin, M.S.L-citrulline (CIT), a nonessential amino acid that can be found in abundance in watermelon and watermelon rind, has garnered an increasing amount of attention among sport nutrition researchers for its potential benefit to sport performance, particularly in endurance events. The effects of CIT on an exercising individual are thought to be two-fold, both increasing blood flow to working muscle through the enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) production and enhancing clearance of...
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How Do Oral Contraceptives Affect Bone’s Response to Exercise and Disuse and the Risk for Osteoporosis?

How Do Oral Contraceptives Affect Bone’s Response to Exercise and Disuse and the Risk for Osteoporosis?

  • 4/20/2016 6:18:00 AM
  • View Count 1560
Anita Mantri, B.S.Osteoporosis afflicts roughly 8 million American women (13). Exercise is often prescribed as a measure of preventing osteoporosis due to its ability to increase bone formation. This eventually increases bone mineral density thus providing a reserve of bone to protect against losses due to estrogen deficiency from menopause. According to CDC reports, from 2011-2013, roughly 26% of American women between the ages of 15 and 44 used oral contraceptives (OCs) as their primary form o...
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At-Risk Boys’ Intrinsic Motivation toward Physical Activity Declines over Time

At-Risk Boys’ Intrinsic Motivation toward Physical Activity Declines over Time

  • 4/18/2016 4:47:00 AM
  • View Count 4174
Jiling Liu, M. EdRegular physical activity (PA) is important for children’s health and development. Exercising daily can reduce heart disease, obesity, and bone problems. Regular PA burns out stress and makes people feel good. Children’s academic learning can also improve through habitual exercises.Recently, PA opportunities for children are becoming fewer. One reason is that schools have focused more on students’ academic performances. At the same time, schools have cut down t...
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Is L-Carnitine Effective On Weight Loss and Exercise Recovery?

Is L-Carnitine Effective On Weight Loss and Exercise Recovery?

  • 4/1/2016 6:40:00 AM
  • View Count 1926
Majid Koozehchian, MSL-Carnitine and Weight Loss:L-carnitine (CARN) is a trimethylamine molecule being synthesized in mammals from essential amino acids lysine and methionine in the kidney, liver, and brain or ingested through diet. CARN is a cofactor of carnitine palmitoyl transferase and serves as a transporter of long-chain fatty acids such as triglycerides across the mitochondria for β-oxidation (1, 2); therefore, CARN supplementation may increase lipid metabolism and promotes a decreas...
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How to Learn a New Motor Sequence Movement Effectively: Using a Differing Practice Schedule

How to Learn a New Motor Sequence Movement Effectively: Using a Differing Practice Schedule

  • 3/25/2016 7:56:00 AM
  • View Count 3530
Taewon Kim, MSIt is well recognized that sequential movement skills are a fundamental to our daily life. We may think of driving a vehicle, typing a computer keyboard, texting with smart phone, and playing many sports. These daily behaviors require some kind of sequence movement skills. Thus, learning these skills allows people to live more efficiently. For example, typing a keyboard, which requires sequential finger movements to press the keyboard with while typing words or something. A fast ty...
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Cholesterol: The Good, The Bad, and The Dysfunctional

Cholesterol: The Good, The Bad, and The Dysfunctional

  • 3/4/2016 6:22:00 AM
  • View Count 1100
Adam Kieffer, MSIf you’ve visited your doctor for a check-up and had your blood cholesterol checked, chances are you were told about “good” and “bad” cholesterol. If your numbers weren’t the best, or you have a family history of heart disease, your doctor may have recommended that you decrease your “bad” cholesterol and increase your “good” cholesterol. Your “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol del...
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